Magical Food Drive 

Let's kick off the summer with a splash! Help us to replenish the Ottawa Food Bank.

Event: FREE MAGIC SHOW for all ages.
Where: Qualicum Community Centre
Location: 48 Nanaimo Drive, Ottawa
When: Saturday June 25, 10:15 -11:00 am

Food Drive Event runs from 10 am - 2pm on Saturday June 25.
Please bring 2 non-perishable food items.


For cash donation to Ottawa Food Bank:

Can't attend! No problems. We can make arrangement for pick up.

Spread the word!! Looking forward to see you there.
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Ottawa’s May Residential Resales Underperform Expectations

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,846 residential properties in May through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 2,285 in May 2021, a decrease of 19 per cent. May’s sales included 1,384 in the residential-property class, down 22 per cent from a year ago, and 462 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 11 per cent from May 2021. The five-year average for total unit sales in May is 2,031.


“With year-over-year resales declining in March and April, and now with this downward trend continuing into May, traditionally the highest performing month for resales, it is quite clear that Ottawa’s resale market is shifting away from the blazing pace of 2021,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Penny Torontow. “And if rising interest rates, cost of living, and inflation aren’t enough factors to cause a pullback, the powerful and deadly storm that brought our city to its knees last month has justifiably impacted the market as well.”


“Our data shows a sharp decline in new listings with a corresponding increase in cancelled/suspended listings on the MLS® System in the period following the storm. Overall, in May, however, there were 3,120 properties that entered the market. This is on par with last May and is 5% over the 5-year average. The result is an 18% increase in residential-class inventory. Meanwhile, there was a slight decline (0.4%) in condominium inventory, but this is not surprising since they have likely become an entry point for many first time homebuyers due to the affordable price point.”


The average sale price for a condominium class property in May was $472,920, an increase of 11 per cent from 2021, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $802,393, increasing 8 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $824,276 for residential and $470,353 for condominiums, these values represent a 12 per cent increase over 2021 for both property classes.*


“Average prices, while still higher than 2021, are showing signs of adjusting to the pace of the market with a month-over-month decrease of 2% in both property classes. In April, we also saw a decline of 1-3%. In contrast, January to March experienced month-to-month increases ranging from 2% to 12%. This may be good news for Buyers, including the fact that the months of inventory have increased to 1.2 for residential and 1 month for condominiums. We are still a far cry away from a balanced market, but it finally seems to be moving in the right direction,” Torontow suggests.


“Additionally, another statistic that we see increasing is the cumulative days on market (CDOM), which is now 14 days, increasing from 11 days last May. CDOMs are typically between 30-60 days in a balanced market, and usually closer to that one-month mark in Ottawa. I mention this because we don’t want Sellers to panic if their homes aren’t selling as quickly as perhaps their neighbours’ properties did. Buyers will also have a little more breathing room if this trend continues.”


“But at the end of the day, each property for sale has its own hyper-local market factors (location, condition, other properties for sale in the same neighbourhood, etc.) that will affect the final sale price. If you want to know the most accurate price point to sell your home or what is the true market value of a home you are interested in, a licensed professional REALTOR® has the education and the experience with access to the most current market statistics and property information, to guide you into making the optimal decision for you and your budget.”


REALTORS® also help with finding rentals and vetting potential tenants. Since the beginning of the year, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 2,320 properties compared to 1,837 last year at this time.


* OREB cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,889 residential properties in April through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 2,394 in April 2021, a decrease of 21 per cent. April’s sales included 1,419 in the residential-property class, down 23 per cent from a year ago, and 470 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 13 per cent from April 2021. The five-year average for total unit sales in April is 1,849.


“With the number of transactions just slightly over the 5-year average, this was one of the weakest performing Aprils we have seen in a while,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board’s President Penny Torontow. “Considering that the number of new listings increased last month, it is a bit of a surprise that sales were off.”


“Certainly, there are a few factors at play: rising interest rates, growing Buyer frustration, April’s cooler temperatures, as well as the housing supply measures recently announced by the government - these could all be causing Buyers to pull back with a wait-and-see approach. We are watching the rest of the spring market closely to determine if this could perhaps be an early indicator of a shift in the market. Since April is only one month, we will be monitoring to see if it becomes a trend moving forward.”


“The fact remains that it is still a Seller’s market with supply under one month. Bidding wars and multiple offers persist in some pockets, prices continue to rise, albeit more moderately, and the market remains relatively strong,” she adds.


The average sale price for a condominium class property in April was $473,702, an increase of 11 per cent from 2021, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $829,318, increasing 12 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $830,588 for residential and $469,603 for condominiums, these values represent a 13 per cent and 12 percent increase over 2021, respectively.*


“Limited supply and high demand will continue to place upward pressure on prices. And as long as there are Buyers willing to pay, average prices will reflect the inventory shortage. However, it is conceivable that price growth may moderate as we do not see the level of price escalations that occurred earlier in the pandemic,” Torontow suggests.


“Although the number of new listings in April (2,846) was down by 11% from 2021, the number of properties that entered the market was still 10% over the 5-year average (2,600), and 214 units more than what was added to the housing stock in March. This has increased Ottawa’s months of inventory to just under a month’s supply. In March, it was just over two weeks. This is good news for potential Buyers as they will have more options and more opportunities to enter the market.”


“In fact, the condominium market may be performing slightly better than residential property classes due to the fact that they are the most affordable price point to enter the market and could possibly now be considered the new entry-level property type.”


“We have also noticed a marked increase in the number of rental properties listed on the MLS® System. Since the beginning of the year, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 1,786 properties compared to 1,458 last year at this time. An increase of 23% and almost double the quantity recorded in pre-pandemic years. As for lease prices, the average cost for a 1-bdrm is approximately $1,850, and a 2-bdrm is $2,200 for rentals listed on the MLS® System. These values are roughly 3-4% higher than this time in 2021. Ottawa REALTORS® are an excellent resource when it comes to finding a rental property or vetting tenants – contact one today!”


* OREB cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 2,011 residential properties in March through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 2,274 in March 2021, a decrease of 12 per cent. March’s sales included 1,493 in the residential-property class, down 12 per cent from a year ago, and 518 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 10 per cent from March 2021. The five-year average for total unit sales in March is 1,792.


“Although the number of sales in March decreased from last year at this time, it was still a robust and busy start to the spring season. Transactions increased 42% over February (590 units) and were 12% higher than the 5-year average. Last March was unseasonably warm in comparison, and the lion-like weather that pervaded most of this March may have played a role. More likely, the lifting of some restrictions and opportunity for unfettered travel during the spring break had peoples’ attention turning towards other activities during the month,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Penny Torontow.


“March tends to be the early indicator of the spring resale market pace, so we anticipate April’s numbers will be a better indication of just how the spring market will perform, which tends to be the peak time of year for resales,” she adds.


The average sale price for a condominium-class property in March was $479,405, an increase of 10 per cent from 2021, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $853,615, increasing 13 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $831,122 for residential and $467,915 for condominiums, these values represent a 14 per cent and 13 percent increase over 2021, respectively.*


“Average prices continue on their upward trend, albeit only increasing 2-3% over February’s figures, the year over year percentage increases of 13-14% validate that the housing supply shortage will continue to put strong upward pressure on prices until that is remedied.”


“Last month saw 2,632 new listings enter the MLS® System, and although 6% lower than March 2021, this is still 4% (or 100 units) above the 5-year average. Residential-class property inventory is approximately 10.5% higher than last year at this time, with condominium-class inventory down 12%. Overall, we are just slightly over (.6%) a half month’s supply of inventory and require at least four months of inventory to be considered within a balanced market.”


“It is encouraging to see new inventory entering the resale market. However, these properties are being quickly absorbed due to the unrelenting high demand, and more listings are crucial to meeting this need,” Torontow advises.


“We appreciate the provincial government has introduced the first phase of its More Homes For Everyone Act to tackle the housing shortage by implementing measures, including working with municipalities to get homes built faster and increasing the Non-Resident Speculation Tax. This is a good start, and we are hopeful that with the application of these and further measures, Ottawa’s many potential home buyers waiting on the sidelines will finally be able to get a foothold in our local market.”


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 1,291 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 1,079 by March 2021.


* OREB cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,421 residential properties in February through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,385 in February 2021, an increase of 3 per cent. February’s sales included 1,095 in the residential-property class, up 7 per cent from a year ago, and 326 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 10 per cent from February 2021. The five-year average for total unit sales in February is 1,184.


“Although February’s resales were only 3% higher than last year at this time, we saw a 52% increase in the number of transactions compared to January’s figures (936). While a month-to-month increase is typical for this time of year, the gradation of this increase is higher than previous years, which could be an indication that our spring market may ramp up earlier this year,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Penny Torontow.


“Whether this has to do with the easing of government pandemic restrictions and the opening up of the economy or perhaps due to apprehension of the (then) upcoming interest rate increase, which is now in effect, we can’t entirely be sure,” she adds. “We are watching intently to see how the 2022 spring market will play out considering not only the higher interest rates and inflation but also other macro factors in our global environment that could affect our local economy.”


“Undoubtedly, the interest rate increase along with the higher rate of inflation will weaken potential Buyers’ purchasing power. And even though average price growths are not as acute as they were in the past two years, we are still seeing significant increases that are without question a result of the unrelenting high demand and current housing stock scarcity.”


The average sale price for a condominium- class property in February was $466,682, an increase of 15 per cent from 2021, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $837,517, increasing 17 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $812,813 for residential and $458,107 for condominiums, these values represent a 16 per cent increase over February 2021 for both property classes. *


“The number of new listings in February (1,762) offers a slight glimmer of hope for prospective Buyers. At 4% higher than the five-year average and 12% higher than February 2021, it resulted in an almost 10% increase in residential-class property inventory compared to last year at this time. Condominium supply, however, is down 20%. Overall, we are now at a 0.7 month’s supply of inventory which means that most listings that enter the market are going to be snapped up very quickly, as evidenced by the continuous decline in Days on Market (DOM). We certainly hope this trend of increased new listings will continue to supplement the housing stock going forward,” Torontow acknowledges.


“Ottawa is a beautiful city with a healthy, stable economy and is a utopic place to work, live and play. It attracts Canadians from other cities and people from all over the world. But it is deeply entrenched in a Seller’s Market. This means homebuyers need to have all their ducks in a row and are prepared to move expeditiously. A REALTOR® will have the knowledge to ensure you are making your best offer at the optimal time. Sellers also need the experience and resources a REALTOR® brings to ensure they are strategically positioning their homes given the conditions of their neighbourhood and property type. Don’t gamble with what is likely your biggest asset – contact a professional REALTOR® today!”


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 800 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 674 by February 2021.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.


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Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 936 residential properties in January through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 963 in January 2021, a decrease of 3 per cent. January’s sales included 661 in the residential-property class, down 2 per cent from a year ago, and 275 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 5 per cent from January 2021. The five-year average for total unit sales in January is 840.


“January’s sales, almost identical to 2021’s, were very strong for a traditionally slower month, especially given the frigid temperatures and increased government Covid-19 restrictions we experienced,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Penny Torontow. “This increased activity compared to previous years is not solely a pandemic phenomenon. Yes, the pandemic has accelerated market activity in some ways, but pent-up Buyer demand due to the housing supply shortage has been an ongoing fundamental issue for the Ottawa resale market for well over 5 years now - and the price increases will continue to reflect that until the housing stock grows.”


The average sale price for a condominium-class property in January was $447,943, an increase of 18 per cent from 2021, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $771,739, increasing 14 per cent from a year ago.*


“Average prices continue to rise steadily with the lack of inventory pushing prices to levels previously unseen. We only need to observe the number of homes now selling over $1M for a clear demonstration. In 2020, they represented 3% of residential sales, in 2021, they held 9% of the market’s resales, and now in 2022, that number reflects close to 14% of detached home sales.”


“Meanwhile, the residential-class properties selling within the $650- $900K range represent 47% of all of January’s residential unit sales. In 2021, it was 33%. But we must keep in mind, average prices statistics amalgamate data from the entire city, so while in some areas the increases would be less, other pockets of Ottawa may see more,” advises Torontow.


“The condo market is also flourishing both in number of sales and prices. Possibly due to the fact that residential units may be out of reach for some Buyers, they are finding themselves more open to this option and are actually able to find a condominium-class property within their budget.”


“Bad weather, pandemic lockdowns, it doesn’t matter - Ottawa remains a fast-moving, active, and robust market. So, if you are thinking of selling your property, there has never been a better time. Contact a REALTOR® who can explain the various factors that will help you get the best price for your home today.


” In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 410 properties in January 2022 compared to 333 in 2021.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood. 

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2021 Resale Market Normalizes and Breaks Records


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 862 residential properties in December through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 997 in December 2020, a decrease of 14 per cent. December’s sales included 601 in the residential-property class, down 15 per cent from a year ago, and 261 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 10 per cent from December 2020. The five-year average for total unit sales in December is 809.


“December’s resale market performed as it typically does with a marked decrease in sales from November as families turned their attention towards the holiday break. Although slightly above the five-year average, the number of properties exchanging hands was lower than the year before due to the atypical market we experienced in 2020 when peak market activity shifted to later in the year because of the initial spring pandemic lockdown,” states Debra Wright Ottawa Real Estate Board’s 2021 President. “However, while the market normalized in the latter part of the year, looking at the year-end figures, 2021 was still a record-breaking year,” she adds.


The total number of residential and condo units sold throughout 2021 was 20,302, compared with 18,953 in 2020, increasing 7 per cent. Meanwhile, total sales volume in 2021 was approximately $13.1B compared to $10B in 2020.

“This significant increase in sales volume reflects the price acceleration that we have seen over the last year and correlates with average sale price increases for the city,” Wright elaborates.


“As we have reiterated for the past few years, Ottawa’s housing inventory challenges have been and will continue to place an upward pressure on prices. Reviewing the year-end figures for 2021, the average sale price year to date was $719,605 for residential-class properties and $419,683 for condominium units. These values represent a 24 per cent and 16 percent increase over 2020, respectively.”


The average sale price for a condominium class property in December was $399,125, an increase of 12 per cent from 2020, and the average sale price for a residential-class property was $709,980, increasing 18 per cent from a year ago. *


“Six hundred new listings entered the housing stock in December, which represents a 58% decrease from November and down 15% from the 5-year average. At less than one month’s supply of units in both the residential and condominium property classes, we are firmly entrenched in a strong Seller’s market and will continue to be in this state until our inventory increases to a 3-4 month’s supply for a balanced market to be achieved,” cautions Wright.

When asked for a forecast, Ottawa Real Estate Board’s new 2022 President Penny Torontow suggests, “January through March are usually slower months. With the macro factors that are currently at play in the resale market, it is difficult to predict what the effects will be going forward. We are entering yet another pandemic wave, Buyers are fatigued, parents are focusing on remote learning, interest rate hikes are looming - I don’t expect we will see the first quarter increases as we did in 2021.”


“We are unlikely to see the true outcome of these macro factors until the spring. Presumably, we will see more of the same with the market performing as well as it can with the current housing stock. Unfortunately for homebuyers, it will sustain itself as a Seller’s market for quite some time until our inventory issues are remedied. Whether you are buying or selling a home right now, the experience and knowledge of a REALTOR® is essential in this current challenging market,” Torontow concludes.


OREB Members also assisted clients with renting 4,813 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 3,364 in 2020. *


The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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June's Residential Resale Market begins to Normalize

 

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 2,131 residential properties in June through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 2,038 in June 2020, an increase of 5 per cent. June’s sales included 1,647 in the residential-property class, up 2 per cent from a year ago, and 484 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 13 per cent from June 2020. The five-year average for total unit sales in June is 2,098.


“June’s resale market performed similar to a typical (pre-pandemic) June, with unit sales on par with the five-year average and a lower volume of activity compared to May, particularly in the last two weeks of the month. This is a normal tapering off as families turn their attention to end of school events and enjoying more outdoor recreation. This year, it also coincided with some easing of pandemic restrictions,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Debra Wright. “It will be interesting to watch the market over the summer to see if this normalization of the real estate sales ebb and flow is indeed the case moving forward. Last year, summer resales skyrocketed due to pent-up demand when the first lockdown ended.”


“Year-to-date sales are tracking 48% higher than last year at this time with 11,446 properties changing hands and are 16-18% higher than 2018 and 2019. Much of this increase is due to the increased activity in the first five months of 2021 compared to previous years. We have also seen an instrumental increase in new listings this year, and inventory levels for both residential and condominiums are higher than we’ve seen since 2017. However, we are still at a one month supply of housing stock, so we aren’t out of the woods yet.”


June’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $435,198, an increase of 21 per cent from last year, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $725,970, an increase of 26 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $734,357 for residential and $422,734 for condominiums, these values represent a 33 per cent and 20 percent increase over 2020, respectively.*


“For the moment, there are signs that we’ve reached a levelling out, especially as it relates to average prices which, in recent months, have not experienced the drastic increases of earlier in 2021, nor are we seeing a drop,” notes Wright.


“Properties are not moving as quickly as they were. Inventory has picked up; there is less scarcity and more choices - consequently, less upward pressure on prices. Additionally, we are noticing fewer of the multiple offer frenzy situations. Of course, many properties do still have multiple offers, but our REALTORS® are noticing that there are less of them on offer day.”


“This start of a perhaps equilibrium in the market is good news for Buyers, while Sellers are going to have to adjust to this new normal and be more strategic in their positioning. Whichever side of the transaction you are on, you will bode well by listening and heeding the advice of a professional REALTOR® who has their pulse on the day-to-day variabilities Ottawa’s resale market is experiencing,” Wright suggests.


OREB Members also assisted clients with renting 2,252 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 1,512 at this time last year.


* OREB cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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April's Real Estate Market Starts Strong and Sputters


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 2,402 residential properties in April through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 911 in April 2020, an increase of 164 per cent. April’s sales included 1,859 in the residential-property class, up 166 per cent from a year ago, and 543 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 155 per cent from April 2020. The five-year average for total unit sales in April is 1,830.


“As the typical spring market ramped up, April was poised to be the strongest on record with over 3,200 new listings of properties for sale. Most of these properties entered the market before the province’s stricter lockdown order was announced midway through the month. At that point, the trajectory sputtered, and while it continued to be active, it followed a noticeable decline as Sellers responded to the government’s resolution to reduce the spread of Covid-19,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board President Debra Wright.


“Nevertheless, the number of transactions managed to surpass unit sales recorded in previous Aprils, and we presume the figures would have been even higher in different circumstances,” she adds.


“As I had cautioned last month, the percentage increases over 2020 figures are vastly skewed due to the first State of Emergency last spring, which had initially slowed down the real estate market. Thus, the 155 to 166 percent increases in unit sales are simply not valid results. We recorded 2,026 sales in April 2019 and 2,024 in April 2018. These figures provide a more reasonable comparison, which is a 19% increase in overall sales compared to those pre-pandemic years.”


April’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $427,145, an increase of 30 per cent from last year, while the average sale price for a residential-class property was $743,204, an increase of 42 per cent from a year ago. With year-to-date average sale prices at $734,682 for residential and $418,792 for condominiums, these values represent a 35 per cent and 20 percent increase over 2020, respectively.*


“These accelerated price increases boil down to a lack of supply and will continue to be a challenge for Buyers until more inventory becomes available – it’s fundamental supply and demand economics. Certainly, April’s substantial increase in new listings, 19% higher than the five-year listing average and over 400 units more than the previous month, gives us cautious optimism. When the Stay-atHome order concludes, we hope that pentup supply will bring some much-needed housing stock to the resale market,” suggests Wright.


“However, there are many factors at play which make it difficult to forecast the path of Ottawa’s real estate market: interest rate modifications, the skyrocketing cost of building materials, the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) proposal to increase the mortgage stress test, changing consumer perspectives with some Buyers opting to move to outlying communities and Quebec, etc.”


“On the one hand, record low interest rates, increased household savings, a strengthening economy, and a continued focus on living space during the pandemic are all factors that bolster demand, while steady price growth is encouraging more Sellers to list their home.


On the other hand, some people are truly struggling and small businesses are closing their doors. It’s complicated, it’s out of balance, and the course of our local market is not entirely predictable at this time,” Wright concludes.


OREB Members also assisted clients with renting 1,458 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 947 at this time last year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Ottawa’s Resale Market “Steady as She Goes”


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 2,146 residential properties in October through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,604 in October 2019, a year over year increase of 34 per cent. October’s sales included 1,665 in the residential property class, up 38 per cent from a year ago, and 481 in the condominium property category, an increase of 22 per cent from October 2019. The five-year average for October unit sales is 1,515.


“We are heading into the colder months, the second wave of the pandemic is upon us, and yet Ottawa’s resale market continues to hold steady,” observes Ottawa Real Estate Board President Deb Burgoyne.


“While the October average price gains, number of sales, and new listings coming onto the market were all down from September, demand persists, and the number of sellers choosing to enter the market remains strong. With 1,937 residential listings and 708 condo units added to the housing stock in October, this is a 48% and 70% respective increase in new listings over last year at this time,” she adds.


October’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $368,936, an increase of 16 per cent from this time last year, while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $603,253, an increase of 25 per cent from a year ago. With yearto-date average sale prices at $579,026 for residential and $361,666 for condominiums, these values represent a 19 per cent percent increase over 2019 for both property classes.*


“The condominium market is on our watchlist. Inventory for condo units increased 15% over last October, while inventory for residential properties is down 46%. This is an inverse relationship compared to the beginning of 2020 when condo supply was depleting much quicker than residential,” reports Burgoyne.


“The shift in the condo market occurred around June. There has been a lot of speculation about changing buyer behaviour and preferences due to our pandemic reality with homeowners wanting home offices and gym space, for example. One could extrapolate or conclude that buying preferences may be shifting towards a desire for properties with more square footage than this property type offers. Particularly, due to the sheer number of employees working remotely for the foreseeable future, commute times may continue to be less of an issue.”


“As the chillier weather and upcoming holiday season approaches, it will be interesting to see how the market calibrates. Typically, we start to see a slowdown in home sale activity. Whether that actually transpires is something we can’t predict given the topsy turvy year that is 2020. What I can tell you is that this is not the time to navigate the market on your own; there is too much at stake to venture in without the knowledge and guidance of an experienced REALTOR®,” Burgoyne concludes.


In addition to residential and condominium sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 2,829 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 2,334 at this time last year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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What Will Homes Look Like In A Post-pandemic World?


A lot has changed in just a few months, and for many that includes the idea of what a 'dream home' looks like. Not long ago, buyers were showing preference toward smaller homes and open concept spaces conducive to gathering. After a few months cooped up inside, those features don't seem so appealing - and developers have taken note.

"While the coronavirus still rages on, it's hard to predict what post-pandemic abodes might look like," according to Barrons. "Yet, developers around the U.S. are already rethinking projects, anticipating residents' needs and preferences that Covid-19 would spur. In doing so, they are re-evaluating current in-unit aesthetics and in-demand amenities."



Here are just a few areas of home design where trends may shift in the coming years:

Home size
Homes had been trending smaller, but that may be over. With so many families spending (way) more time around the home lately, there's never been more need for personal space. Expect homes to grow in size accordingly.

Prioritizing the home office
As more and more businesses relax work-from-home policies, or shift to full-time remote work entirely, the home office will become a near-essential for many buyers. A space that was once an after-thought now will need to offer privacy, good lighting and be pre-wired for telecommuting.

Return to the closed-floor plan
For some buyers, the appeal of the open-floor plan was already trending down prior to 2020, and the past few months have only made the reasons why more evident. Sharing more time and space at home demands privacy for school work, hobbies, and entertainment. With more meals being cooked at home, an open concept kitchen becomes noisy epicenter practically all day long. Builders expect a rise in demand for closed floor plans, where rooms are partitioned for purpose.

Smart technology
This is already one of the fastest growing trends in home design, but smart home technology will soon move from a 'plus' to a 'must'. Temperature and lighting control can now be voice or motion-activated. Touchless faucets, once thought superfluous, are now an inexpensive and health-conscious upgrade. Systems that filter air and monitor air quality will become more common and affordable.


Thinking about making a move? Contact us today. We can help you to find the right place.

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March Residential Resales Withstand Pressure of World Crisis

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,525 residential properties in March through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,507 in March 2019, an increase of only 1.2 per cent. March’s sales included 1,170 in the residential-property class, up 3.3 per cent from a year ago, and 355 in the condominium-property category, a decrease of 5.1 per cent from March 2019. The five-year average for March unit sales is 1,465.


“Our results show that the Ottawa real estate market seems to have withstood the pressure of a worldwide economic event in March, however in context with our market’s performance up to this point, we can see the underlying effect. Before the pandemic, monthly unit sales were increasing between 10-16% from 2019, while March’s sales were just on par with a year ago. This is an indicator that there has been a slowdown in the real estate market due to Covid-19.” reports Deborah Burgoyne, Ottawa Real Estate Board President.


“Much of March’s activity likely began in the first two weeks of the month before the State of Emergency order was put into place. In fact, we had a head start on the spring market that was heating up earlier than expected, but activity seemed to fall off as physical distancing measures took effect,” she adds.


“Once the Ontario State of Emergency began, our Members and Brokerages rightly began to make all adjustments necessary for the health and wellbeing of our clients and customers. We welcomed the government’s declaration of real estate as an essential service so that transactions in progress could be completed. However, it was not and is not business as usual for our Members. They are heeding government and public health authority warnings and advice and are being diligent in taking extra safety precautions. All this, while still doing their best to help their clients successfully conclude or close real estate transactions that were already in progress,” Burgoyne acknowledges.


March’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $369,311, an increase of 27.3 per cent from this time last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $559,739, an increase of 16.5 per cent from a year ago. Year to date figures show an 18.8 per cent and a 23.2 per cent increase in average sale prices for residential and condominiums, respectively.*


“Our Members are evolving and adapting their business practices by leveraging the use of technology with virtual tours, live streaming, social media, and becoming more creative in their methods to facilitate the needs of their clients who may need to buy or sell right now because of their circumstances.”


“However, for those buyers and sellers who are not in that urgent position, our Members recognize the health and safety of our community is paramount. They are consulting with these clients on a case by case basis and may advise that they should delay the listing of their home or a purchase. They are doing what’s best for their clients in the context of government advisories,” affirms Burgoyne.


When asked about the impact of Covid-19 on the number of new listings on the market, Burgoyne speculates, “The shortage of inventory has driven down the number of new listings for the past several years, so we cannot accurately state that the decrease in March was due to Covid-19 where we saw 1,579 new residential listings and 469 for condos. The 5-year average is 2,217 and 665, respectively. I believe that April’s number will provide a truer and more legitimate reflection of the impact of Covid-19 on our local real estate market.”


“In closing, I would like to say that we are grateful to have been granted the essential service designation and are working closely with all levels of government and our provincial and national associations to ensure that we implement the necessary steps and protocols to flatten the curve and remain the trusted advisors that the public have come to expect from the REALTOR® profession.” In addition to residential and condominium sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 746 properties since the beginning of the year compared to 550 at this time last year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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January Resales Lose Momentum


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 780 residential properties in January through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 817 in January 2019, a decrease of 4.5 per cent. January’s sales included 558 in the residential-property class, down 8.4 per cent from a year ago, and 222 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 6.7 per cent from January 2019. The five-year average for January unit sales is 713.


“2020 is off to a slower start as the shortage of inventory is now impacting market momentum,” states Ottawa Real Estate Board’s President Deborah Burgoyne. “Although we have higher sales than the five-year average, due to increased condo sales, the persistent supply challenges seem to have finally caught up with us. Furthermore, the number of new listings that came on the market in January (1,082) is well below the average (1,651).”


“We don’t expect this trajectory to change anytime in the foreseeable future,” Burgoyne acknowledges. “The supply chain needs to be buffered at all points along the continuum from first time and move-up buyers, to downsizing boomers as well as renters. They are all interconnected links in the housing chain.”


January’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $338,077, an increase of 19.1 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $516,229, an increase of 19.3 per cent from a year ago. Compared to last month, however, the average price for residential-class properties increased by a modest 3.2 per cent and the average price for condominium-class units was 8.8 per cent higher.*


The Board’s Housing Price Index (HPI), which is another data point of price trends based on the specific housing stock in neighbourhoods, indicates that the overall benchmark price for Ottawa has increased by approximately 13.75% from last year.


The most active price range in the condominium market was $200,000 to $349,999, accounting for 55 per cent of the units sold while $400,000 to $549,999 represented the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 40 per cent of January’s transactions.


“The fact is Ottawa’s market has always been steadily increasing at a reasonable pace and is sustainable. If buyers are waiting for prices to decline, based on historical trends, it’s not likely,” Burgoyne cautions. “Although supply may pick up eventually—if you need to get into the market, don’t wait. It’s a challenging market for everyone. Hire a trusted professional to ensure you are protected and well informed in your home buying or selling transaction.”


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 243 properties in January 2020 compared with 169 in January 2019.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood

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Record-Breaking 2019 Closes out Decade

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board (OREB) sold 761 residential properties in December through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 660 in December 2018, an increase of 15.3 percent. December’s sales included 534 in the residential property class, up 13.9 percent from a year ago, and 227 in the condominium property class, an increase of 18.8 percent from December 2018. The five-year average for December unit sales is 720.


“December’s statistics reflect the same story we’ve seen all year - historically low supply yet higher unit sales than in previous years. Days on market continued to decline, especially in certain pockets of the city, as properties that came on the market were snapped up by prepared buyers,” states Dwight Delahunt, Ottawa Real Estate Board’s 2019 President. “Unit sales in the condominium class consistently led the way, offering lower price point options for homebuyers that simply weren’t available in the residential category,” he adds.


The total number of residential and condo units sold throughout 2019 was 18,622, compared with 17,467 in 2018, an increase of 6.6 percent. Residential property class sales went up by 4.7 percent with 14,038 properties exchanging hands last year compared to 13,411 in 2018. Condominium property class sales increased 13 percent with 4,584 units sold in 2019 versus 4,056 in the previous year.


“2019 was a record-breaker in both the number of sales as well as average prices, with the residential property class reaching $500K in several months during the year. This price growth is warranted due to the fundamental economic principle of supply and demand playing out, with limited supply putting upward pressure on prices. However, even with these increases, Ottawa’s real estate market continues to remain one of the most affordable and sustainable in the country,” Delahunt stresses.


December’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $310,675, an increase of 11.5 percent from a year ago while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $500,306, an increase of 10.3 percent from December 2018. Year-end figures show an average sale price of $486,590 for residential class properties in 2019, an 8.9 percent increase from 2018 and $304,203 for condominium properties, up 9.3 percent from last year.*


OREB’s 2020 President, Deborah Burgoyne, forecasts Ottawa will continue to experience limited supply and reasonably increasing average prices this year. “Supply issues will surely persist into 2020, and I don’t expect the inventory will be able to recover in the near future,” she suggests.


“Builders do seem keen on constructing luxury rental units, which is something we haven’t seen much of before. These could potentially add inventory to the residential class, as boomers will have decent options if they are considering entering a different lifestyle than homeownership. However, even if supply increases, high demand has shifted market values upwards in various neighbourhoods and prices are unlikely to go back down – this is our new reality,” concludes Burgoyne.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Weather Isn't Cooling the Resale Market

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,288 residential properties in November through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,161 in November 2018, an increase of 10.9 per cent. November’s sales included 958 in the residential-property class, up 10.5 per cent from a year ago, and 330 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 12.2 per cent from November 2018. The five-year average for November unit sales is 1,133.


“Even with the typical winter slowdown, Ottawa’s home resale market still experienced a relatively brisk pace in November. Our inventory is not having a chance to build as it is being absorbed as quickly as it comes on the market. That’s why there are so many sales every month even though the supply stock is low,” explains Dwight Delahunt, President of the Ottawa Real Estate Board.


November’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $313,734, an increase of 9.8 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $501,201, an increase of 16.9 per cent from a year ago. Year to date figures show an 8.9 per cent and 9.1 per cent increase in average sale prices for residential and condominiums, respectively.*


“Prices have increased, and therefore there is shortage of units available in the lower end price range of both condos and residential properties,” reports Delahunt. “That being said, the Ottawa market still remains strong and sustainable with reasonable increases in year to date average prices of 9% in both the residential and condominium property classes.”


The most active price range in the condominium market was $225,000- $349,999, accounting for 57.5 per cent of the units sold while $350,000 to $499,999 represented the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 38.8 per cent of November’s transactions. Residential properties in the $500,000 to $749,999 range increased to 32 per cent of all residential resales.


“As for the higher end of the market, we are seeing substantial increases in the number of properties sold in those price ranges as well. In the $750K-$1M range, 65 units changed hands last month compared to 24 sales last year at this time,” reveals Delahunt. “Further, the homes in the $1M+ plus range have increased to 29 sales last month from 15 sold in November 2018.”


“Year to date totals show the larger picture with a 41% increase in the $750K-$1M range from 610 to 861 unit sales, and a 30% increase in the $1M+ range from 266 to 345 transactions compared to this time last year,” he adds.


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 2,559 properties since the beginning of the year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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October’s Whirlwind Resale Market


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,607 residential properties in October through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,375 in October 2018, an increase of 16.9 per cent. October’s sales included 1,211 in the residential-property class, up 15 per cent from a year ago, and 396 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 23 per cent from October 2018. The five-year average for October unit sales is 1,319.


“New listings are down, inventory remains scarce, and yet more homes changed hands this October than in the past decade and a half,” reports Dwight Delahunt, President of the Ottawa Real Estate Board. “It’s perplexing at first; however, when you consider the current breakneck transaction pace in the Ottawa resale market, often requiring homebuyers and sellers to make swift decisions, it makes sense.”


“October’s average Days on Market (DOM) for residential properties decreased by 10 days to 33 days, and the DOM for condominiums decreased to 28 days from the average 47 days experienced this time last year. Year to date figures show 31 DOM (down 8 days) for residential properties and 35 DOM (16 fewer days) for condominiums. Products are flying off the shelves, so to speak.”


October’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $319,208, an increase of 18.3 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential class property was $483,405, an increase of 7.6 per cent from a year ago. Year to date figures show an 8.3 per cent and 9.1 per cent increase in average sale prices for residential and condominiums, respectively.*


“We are seeing slightly above-average climbs in home prices this year, and the equity in many properties is undoubtedly increasing, which is great news for homeowners. Still, the growths are reasonable considering the state of the market and Ottawa retains its reputation of being one of the country’s most affordable cities where residents can enjoy a high quality of life,” Delahunt acknowledges.


The most active price range in the condominium market was $225,000- $349,999, accounting for 53 per cent of the units sold while $350,000 to $499,999 represented the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 43 per cent of October’s transactions. Residential properties in the $500,000 to $749,999 range increased to 30 per cent of all residential resales.


“We are noticing a significant uptick in residential properties sold in the $500-750K price range. This price point now represents almost 1 in every 3 home sales.”


“Even though there are incidences of multiple offers and homes sold for over market value, the reality is that approximately 36% of homes are selling over asking, compared to 21% at this time last year. It is a phenomenon that is affecting specific pockets of the city, but certainly not every neighbourhood or property type.”


“Sellers should use the knowledge of a REALTOR® to understand the complexities of their home’s positioning. Buyers require timely guidance on how to put in an attractive offer in this fast-paced market — and both parties must understand the intricacies of the contracts they are signing,” Delahunt advises.

In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 2,334 properties since the beginning of the year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Sizzling Summer Continues into August


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,731 residential properties in August through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,581 in August 2018, an increase of 9.5 per cent. August’s sales included 1,300 in the residential-property class, up 9.7 per cent from a year ago, and 431 in the condominium-property category, an increase of 8.8 per cent from August 2018. The five-year average for August unit sales is 1,522.


“August’s ten percent increase in unit sales from 2018 is over twice the percentage increase experienced last year and three times higher than the previous August,” reports Dwight Delahunt, Ottawa Real Estate Board President. “However, although the numbers are up, Ottawa continues to undergo issues with inventory as the limited supply persists.”


August’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $308,781, an increase of 11.5 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $484,921, an increase of 11.8 per cent from a year ago. Year to date figures shows an 8.4 per cent and 7.9 per cent increase in average sale prices for residential and condominiums respectively. *


“Year to date average prices, which are more reliable indicators than monthly average prices, show steady, reasonable, and sustainable increases. We don’t anticipate there will be a major correction in the foreseeable future,” Delahunt maintains.


The $350,000 to $499,999 price range was the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 42 per cent of August’s transactions while 27 per cent of residential sales were in the $500,000 to $749,999 range. The most active price point in the condominium market has increased again in 2019 to $250,000-$399,999, accounting for 50 per cent of the units sold.


“As to be expected, now that the units in the lower end of the condo market have been acquired, there appears to be another upward movement in the prices of available condominiums,” Delahunt points out. “Statistics show the higher end of the residential market has picked up with the doubling of unit sales in the $750K to $1M price range from this time last year,” he adds.


When questioned about the government’s First-Time Home Buyer Incentive (FTHBI) which came into effect on September 2, Delahunt cautions, “It’s too early to tell what the impact will be or if there will be any impact in Ottawa’s market – these measures are not helping the supply side. We continue to call on all three levels of government to implement actions to increase supply which will facilitate restoring balance to our local real estate market.”


“Coming into the fall months, which are typically busy, we expect the market will continue to pick up steam,” he speculates. “Your home purchase or sale is not a DIY project; there’s too much at stake. Be sure to find a local REALTOR® with the depth of knowledge and experience that is warranted in one of the biggest investments you will make in your life.”


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 1,906 properties since the beginning of the year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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Hot Market in a Scorching July!

Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 1,842 residential properties in July through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 1,605 in July 2018, an increase of 14.8 per cent. July’s sales included 1,382 in the residential-property class, up 12.3 per cent from a year ago, and 460 in the condominium-property category, a rise of 23 per cent from July 2018. The five-year average for July unit sales is 1,579.


“Typically, after the busy spring, July tends to be a slower month as people take vacations and spend more time with their families, but there was no slow down this past month,” observes Dwight Delahunt, President of the Ottawa Real Estate Board. “In fact, we recorded the highest number of July sales in 15 years.”


“Also, for the first time in 2019, there was an upsurge in new listings which has slightly improved housing inventory. Although this is encouraging news, it is not enough to keep up with demand. In order to bring about a more balanced market, there needs to be at least a three-month supply of listings. Currently, Ottawa is closer to a one-month supply,” he adds.


“In this type of market, it is vital that Sellers utilize the experience and advice of a REALTOR® to maximize your property’s potential — and if you are a Buyer, to guide you through the complexities this intricate market presents,” Delahunt recommends.


July’s average sale price for a condominium-class property was $299,665, an increase of 6.8 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $487,308, an increase of 10.4 per cent from a year ago.*


“Residential house prices continue to increase; however, these are reasonable gains and are not creating a bubble by any stretch,” Delahunt maintains. “Condo prices have now recovered, and the oversupply in that sector no longer exists. Ottawa has a healthy condo market and with major developments coming online in the future, we expect these too will be absorbed in due course.”


The $350,000 to $499,999 price range was the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 42 per cent of July’s transactions while 28 per cent of residential sales were in the $500,000 to $749,999 range. The most active price point in the condominium market, $225,000-$349,999, accounts for 52 per cent of the units sold.

When asked about how the upcoming federal election might affect the real estate market, Delahunt emphasizes, “We continue to believe the stress test is negatively impacting our housing market and look forward to hearing about how the various parties intend on addressing this contentious issue as the election approaches.”


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 1,619 properties since the beginning of the year.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.


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4 DIY Things You Can Do to Lower Your Energy Bill This Summer!


If you live in a place where summer heat is an issue, this time of year can mean substantially higher energy costs. Here are four low-cost, high-impact changes you can make on your own to save money and keep your home more comfortable this summer.

Clean your window sills
A few seasons worth of dirt and soot can prevent your windows from closing all the way. Even a little air getting in can make your AC less efficient and raise your electric bill. Drafty windows are the top energy leak in a typical home, accounting for up to 25% of a home's energy loss.
DIY level: Easy. You can even make this a chore for the kids!

Install a door sweep
"A common place where air leaks occur is under the door leading from the house to the garage because they are often not as well sealed as doors leading directly to the outside," says Energy Star. Install a door sweep to seal the gap between the bottom of your door and the threshold to prevent cold air from escaping your home.
DIY level: Easy. Use a drill to make holes in the door and screws to attach the sweep.



Caulk your windows
Window air leakage can be reduced by applying a continuous bead of caulk around the window trim where it meets the wall, at the mitered joints of the trim, and between the trim and the frame. Make sure the caulk is intended for indoor use and can be painted. Using Charlotte, NC as an example, the Department of Energy estimated that the average homeowner could save 14% on heating and cooling costs each year with proper air sealing and insulation.
DIY level: Medium. Caulk can get messy, so go slow.

Check your ducts
Ducts are used to distribute AC and heat throughout houses with forced-air systems "In typical houses, about 20% of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes and poorly connected ducts." says Energy Star. "The result is an inefficient HVAC system, high utility bills, and difficulty keeping the house comfortable, no matter how the thermostat is set." You can check all the ducts you can access, such as those in the attic, crawlspace, or garage. Look for holes and tears, and seal them using mastic or metal tape.
DIY level: Medium. It's just taping, but you'll likely be dealing with tight spaces and a few creepy-crawlies.

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Condo Sales Continue to Dominate Resale Market


Members of the Ottawa Real Estate Board sold 2,105 residential properties in June through the Board’s Multiple Listing Service® System, compared with 2,064 in June 2018, an increase of 2 per cent. June’s sales included 1,612 in the residential-property class, on par with a year ago, and 493 in the condominium property class, a rise of 8.8 per cent from June 2018. The five-year average for June unit sales is 2,002.


“Year to date residential resales are virtually the same as this time last year with 7,565 transactions so far,” announces Dwight Delahunt, Ottawa Real Estate Board President. “Increasing by 8.3%, condo resales are the driving force for the upturn in units sold in the first half of 2019. Combined residential and condo year to date sales of 9,876 show a 1.8 per cent increase from June 2018,” he adds.


June’s average sale price for a condominium class property was $308,482, an increase of 6.2 per cent from last year while the average sale price of a residential-class property was $500,716, a rise of 11.4 per cent from a year ago. *

“Although, the percentage increase in average price for a residential property climbed into the double digits in June, year to date figures indicate a steady growth of 7.6 per cent and 7.5 per cent for residential and condominiums respectively.”


“In the past decade, we have seen an approximate 52% increase in average prices for residential properties and 34% for condominiums, indeed an excellent return on investment for homeowners,” states Delahunt. “With a population reaching one million residents according to the City of Ottawa, we truly enjoy a high quality of living and remain one of Canada’s most affordable major cities – that’s no small feat.”


The $350,000 to $499,999 price range was the most prevalent price point in the residential market, accounting for 43 per cent of June’s transactions while 29 per cent of residential sales were in the $500,000 to $749,999 range. The most active price point in the condominium market for the third straight month, $225,000-$349,999, accounts for 55 per cent of the units sold.


“Some areas of the city are experiencing multiple offers, and the competition for well-priced and positioned properties is brisk. Even though 39% of properties this month sold above the asking price, the vast majority of properties are still being sold at or below the listed price,” Delahunt points out. “A professional REALTOR’S® market knowledge and neighbourhood expertise are invaluable whether you are a buyer or a seller,” he maintains.


“This is not a speculation market. Going forward, we anticipate there will be a high demand in the foreseeable future due to increasing population and strong employment in the area. We are pleased to see all levels of government starting to address the supply side issue, but we feel there is still work to be done. We will be watching the upcoming federal election closely to gain insight as to how the various parties intend on addressing attainable homeownership issues,” Delahunt concludes.


In addition to residential sales, OREB Members assisted clients with renting 1,314 properties since the beginning of the year, and our Commercial Members continue to be very active in our marketplace.


* The Board cautions that the average sale price can be useful in establishing trends over time but should not be used as an indicator that specific properties have increased or decreased in value. The calculation of the average sale price is based on the total dollar volume of all properties sold. Price and conditions will vary from neighbourhood to neighbourhood.

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The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS®, and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are member’s of CREA. The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by CREA and identify the quality of services provided by real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.